Food

  • Aberdeen Rowie

    The buttery, which is also known as a rowie or Aberdeen roll, is basically a bread roll, characterised by a flaky texture and buttery taste. They are often eaten toasted with jam/butter As the alternate name of Aberdeen roll suggests, butteries are a speciality of Aberdeen but they are actually common throughout the North East of Scotland and can be found in Elgin. They were created in the 1880s, to provide the growing Aberdeen fishing industry a type of high-fat roll which would keep for longer perio... Read More

  • Arbroath Smokies Angus Culinary Traditions Year round

    Arbroath Smokies are a particular variery of smoked haddock. They originated in Auchmithie, a small fishing village a few miles north of Arbroath. The smoking technique is similar to one used widely in Scandinavia, which indicates probable Scandinavian origins of the villagers Tradtionally, the fish was smoked in halved barrels with fires underneath, trapping the smoke under layers of hessian sacking. With the decline of local fishing industry at the start of the 20th century, much of the local population ... Read More

  • Bere Bannock

    A bere bannock is a kind of flatbread made with bere, a barley-like grain which has been grown in Orkney for thousands of years, both for human and animal food. In the old days, it was called bygg and today is usually called corn in Orkney. Its cultivation on any scale is currently restricted to Orkney. Bere is still milled at the Barony Mill by Loch Boardhouse on Mainland Orkney and bags of the flour can be bought there, or in local village shops. If you're using it for bread-making, it will produce a heav... Read More

  • Black Bun

    Black bun is a type of fruit cake that is baked within a pastry crust. It was originally eaten on Twelfth Night but now enjoyed at Hogmanay. The cake mixture typically contains raisins, currants, almonds, citrus peel, allspice, ginger, cinnamon and pepper.... Read More

  • Bridie

    A bridie or Forfar bridie is a Scottish type of meat pastry or pie, originally from the town of Forfar, reminiscent of a Cornish pasty, but made without potato! The bridie is made of minced beef, sometimes with onions and spices, placed on rolled-out pastry and folded into a semi-circular shape, and then baked in an oven. Forfar bakers traditionally use shortcrust pastry but similar products on flaky pastry or puff pastry are occasionally found. Traditionally the contents of the bridie are indicated by the ... Read More

  • Clapshot

    Clapshot is a traditional Orkney recipe of tatties (potatoes) and swede (yellow turnip) and may be served with haggis, oatcakes, cold meats or sausages. Clapshot is sometimes called Clapshaw or Orcadian Clapshot. Further afield, clapshot is a traditional accompanyment to haggis.... Read More

  • Clootie / Cloutie Dumplin

    This is a fruit based dumpling cooked in a cloot or clout (cloth). Everyone has their own recipe. See one at http://www.scottishrecipes.co.uk/clootiedumpling.htm and see film of one being made at http://scotland.stv.tv/food-drink/recipes/128262-clootie-dumpling-custard/... Read More

  • Cock a Leekie Soup

    Cock a Leekie Soup is a soup, traditionally served in the winter, made with leeks and chicken stock. It is frequently served as a starter at Scottish events such as Burns Night, St Andrews Night and at Hogmanay. As www.scottishrecipes.co.uk explains, the soup dates back to the 16th century when a fowl would be boiled with vegetables such as leeks to provide a filling broth and this is why Cock a Leekie soup is so named. A traditional Scottish Cock a Leekie soup recipe includes prunes though some cooks will ... Read More

  • Cranachan

    Cranachan is a traditional Scottish dessert. It is usually made from a mixture of whipped cream, whisky, honey, and fresh raspberries topped with toasted oatmeal. It is sometimes called Atholl Brose (which is more properly a drink using similar ingredients) and Cream Crowdie. A traditional way to serve the dessert is to bring dishes of each ingredient to the table, so that each person can assemble their dessert to taste. Tall dessert glasses are also of typical presentation. It was originally a summer dish... Read More

  • Cullen Skink

    Cullen is a small town in the North east of Scotland, the traditinal home of the soup Cullen Skink. The soup is traditionally made with Finnan haddock, potatoes and onions. Finnan haddock is often called Finnan haddie. The word skink means soup or stew. ... Read More

  • Fish supper

    The 'Fish Supper' consists of fish (commonly haddock in Scotland) deep fried in batter with chips purchased from a 'Chip shop'. It is traditionally served wrapped first in brown paper, then in newspaper in order that the food should retain its heat on the customer's journey home. This is more than a foodstuff in Scotland - it is truly a tradition. The traditional question from the Chip Shop proprietor to the customer on serving the delicacy: 'Anyhin oan it?' can be met with the reply,'Sauce an salt' i... Read More

  • Haggis

    A traditional food of Scotland eaten across the country made from meat offal, herbs and spices contained within a natural or artificial skin that is ball-shaped; can also be made as a vegetarian variety. Haggis features in the ICH of the traditional New Year ceremonies and Burns Night. Haggis is exclusively a Scottish traditional food not associated with any other country.... Read More

  • Haggis Pakora

    Pakora is a foodstuff of South Asian origin [see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pakora] Made by binding several ingredients together (onion, potato and other vegetables), coating them in batter then deep-frying them, it is easy to understand why pakora has become popular in Scotland. In addition to chicken pakora, the fusion of Asian and Scots’ cultures has seen the introduction of a haggis variety. ... Read More

  • Haggis, Neeps and Tatties

    Haggis is a tradtional Scottish dish containing sheep's offal (heart, liver and lungs), minced with onion, oatmeal, suet, spices, and salt, mixed with stock, and traditionally simmered in the animal's stomach for approximately three hours (although nowadays haggis tends to be simmered in a casing rather than the stomach). It is often considered to be the national dish of Scotland, and is memorialised in Robert Burns' poem Address to a Haggis. Originally a modest dish ensuring no part of the sheep goes to... Read More

  • Lorne Sausage

    Lorne sausage is a traditional cooked sliced sausage, which is enjoyed across Scotland. The origins of the name appear unclear, with there being some suggestion it is a reference to Scottish comedian Tommy Lorne. The sausage meat itself- which may be pork, beef, or a mixture of the two - is set into a square and sliced into pieces. It is usually served as part of a Scottish breakfast!... Read More

  • Moffat Toffee

    Moffat Toffee is not toffee, but a boiled sweet made in the Scottish town of Moffat.The confectionery is notable for its lemon centre which gives the sweet its unusual flavour. The shop also has its own unique type of tartan which is black and white in colour. It is the largest confectionery shop in Moffat and has a wide range from well known brands to homemade sweets made in the factory that is located in the town.... Read More

  • Rumbledethumps

    Rumbledethumps is a dish that originated in the Borders area of Scotland, the main ingredients of whch are cabbage, potatoes and onions. The name of the dish itself apparently comes from the noise made in the kitchen as the potatoes and cabbage are rumbled and thumped in the preparation. It can be served as a main dish or as an accompaniment to something else. ... Read More

  • Scotch Collops

    Scotch Collops are a traditional Scottish dish; the term 'collops' means 'thin slices of meat', and is derived from the French 'escalope'. The dish can be created using either thin slices or minced meat of either beef, lamb or venison. To prepare the dish, the meat slices are combined with onion, salt, pepper, and suet, then stewed, baked or roasted with optional flavourings according to the meat used. It is traditionally served garnished with thin toast and mashed potato.... Read More

  • Scottish Blackface Carpets and Meat

    The Scottish Blackface Sheep is one Scottish animal that rarely gets the recognition it deserves. Although it is commonly bred on the British Isles, it’s origins are traced back to the Anglo-Scottish border, and it can also be found around the Glasgow area. The wool produced from the Blackface is in a league of its own. It has been used for decades to create quality carpets and clothing that feel fine and comfortable. It is also used for meat across Scotland, including haggis. The Blackface ... Read More

  • Scottish High Tea

    The illustration provided is of a classic AFTERNOON TEA. A Scottish HIGH TEA would be something like poached eggs, fishcakes, or Welsh Rarebit, followed by scones, pancakes, fancy cakes if you were being a bit "society" and pot after pot of tea. It would not include sandwiches - the protein would have been provided by the hot something, whatever it was, and the starch by the scones and pancakes. ... Read More

  • Scottish High Tea

    Normally served between 3-7pm, which is available in some hotels in Scotland. The meal offered varies from location to location. Usually it consists of toast/bread/rolls served with each course, soup or similar starter, main meal (fish or steak pie is common), a choice of puddings and then a huge plate of biscuits, cakes and fancies served on a cake stand. Tea is served throughout the meal. ... Read More

  • Skirlie

    Skirlie is a traditional savoury oat dish made with oats and onions cooked in butter or dripping. It can be either eaten on its own or used as a stuffing for meat dishes such as chicken and other fowl, and also is used to enhance mince and tatties and stovies.... Read More

  • Stovies

    Stovies is a traditional potato-based Scottish dish, although the precise ingredients vary widely. In addition to potatoes, the dish will usually contain onions and often leftover roast beef, mince or other meat. The potatoes are cooked by stewing with fat; stove also having the meaning of stew or to stew in Scots. Lard, beef dripping or butter may be used.... Read More

  • Tablet

    Tablet is a hard, sugary slab of confectionary, with a brittle, grainy texture. It is usually made from sugar, condensed milk, and butter. It is often flavoured with vanilla, and sometimes has nut pieces in it. The tablet is made by boiling the mixture, allowing the sugar to crystallize, then letting it cool and set, at which point it can be sliced into bars or chunks. Additionally, it is often flavoured with vanilla, and can have nut pieces in it. It's a bit like toffee, but not chewy!... Read More

  • Tattie scone

    Tattie (Tatty) scones or potato scone are usually served as part of a Scottish breakfast. There are many Scottish recipes for Tattie Scones a couple of links provided. A typical Tattie scone is made with mashed potato, plain flour, butter and salt. The flour is added to make it into a dough. Some recipes include egg. The dough is rolled out to about 5mm and put on a griddle to cook or baked in a hot oven. They are traditionally made as circles of about 90 mm in radius and then cut into quarters. They are... Read More

  • Wedding Cogs

    Wooden wedding cogs are vessels from which ale is consumed at Orcadian weddings. These cogs have long been a prominent feature of island weddings, and remain a prominent feature today. The exact mixture which now goes into the cog varies with every wedding, as each family tends to have its own views on the correct recipe. Despite the family variations, the base ingredients of this potent alcoholic mixture are usually hot ale, gin, brandy and whisky mixed with sugar and pepper. Traditionally, there were best... Read More

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